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Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.




Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.
“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

unconsumption:

Jeremy Underwood’s ongoing photo series Human Debris repurposes found trash into site-specific sculptures.

Municipal waterways often double as highways for garbage—a well-known and highly visible problem with no obvious solution. So when photographer Jeremy Underwood stumbled across an especially polluted beach in Houston, he decided to make the trash he found into more than just lazily bobbing reminders of intractability.

“I simply couldn’t believe the state this area was in,” Underwood told WIRED by email. “Garbage littered the shoreline, a pungent smell filled the air and signs about the polluted waters stood in confirmation of its degraded state. Hidden from view, I felt something had to be done to bring attention to this beach … it struck me for the first time that taking only a picture was not enough. ”

 (via Monuments Made of Trash Remind Us to Treat Earth More Kindly | Raw File | WIRED)

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we-did-an-internet:

arcaneimages:

This taxidermy was found inside a late 19th-century French mansion which has been sealed up for more than 100 years. Via National Geographic.

Good to know people were just as fucking weird before the internet.

we-did-an-internet:

arcaneimages:

This taxidermy was found inside a late 19th-century French mansion which has been sealed up for more than 100 years. Via National Geographic.

Good to know people were just as fucking weird before the internet.

(via littlebunnynotlost)

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Jimmie Durham
Tlunh Datsi, 1985, Tluhn Datsi was one of the works exhibited in the first show called A Matter of Life and Death and Singing, in New York, 1985. In that period Jimmie Durham intentionally used ethnically coded references in his materials and vocabulary. Tluhn datsi, meaning “panther” in Cherokee, is made of a puma skull with shells, feathers and fur, resting on a wooden stand that says “POLICE DEPT”.Often asked about the question of identity in his work, Durham has said: “I’m accused, constantly, of making art about my own identity. I never have. I make art about the settler’s identity when I make political art. It’s not about my identity, it’s about the Americans’ identity.”

Jimmie Durham

Tlunh Datsi, 1985, Tluhn Datsi was one of the works exhibited in the first show called A Matter of Life and Death and Singing, in New York, 1985. In that period Jimmie Durham intentionally used ethnically coded references in his materials and vocabulary. Tluhn datsi, meaning “panther” in Cherokee, is made of a puma skull with shells, feathers and fur, resting on a wooden stand that says “POLICE DEPT”.
Often asked about the question of identity in his work, Durham has said: “I’m accused, constantly, of making art about my own identity. I never have. I make art about the settler’s identity when I make political art. It’s not about my identity, it’s about the Americans’ identity.”

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Danh Vo “Oma Totem” 2009 Part of an installation Kunsthaus Brengenz
Danh Vo was born in Vietmann but left when he was 4 when his family boarded a boat heading to American. A Danish cargo vessel picked them up on route and they have been in Denmark ever since.  Danh Vo work sometimes addresses American values of consumer goods and status symbols which he believes often distract attention from the real social and political problems. Danh Vo has been selected to represent Denmark at the next Venice Biennale! Via GalleristNY: http://bit.ly/1o91ySD

Danh Vo “Oma Totem” 2009 Part of an installation Kunsthaus Brengenz

Danh Vo was born in Vietmann but left when he was 4 when his family boarded a boat heading to American. A Danish cargo vessel picked them up on route and they have been in Denmark ever since.  Danh Vo work sometimes addresses American values of consumer goods and status symbols which he believes often distract attention from the real social and political problems.
 Danh Vo has been selected to represent Denmark at the next Venice Biennale! Via GalleristNY: http://bit.ly/1o91ySD

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Feathers used for the fashion business

Feathers used for the fashion business

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unconsumption:


The Window Socket is an idea so fabulously simple, it’s slightly amazing that we haven’t seen one before.
Designed by Kyuho Song & Boa Oh, the charger sticks to a window and draws solar power to an internal battery, which enables one to either plug small devices into the outlet right there and then, or save the stored power for use during nighttime hours.

Read more: Window Socket: Portable Solar-Powered Outlet Sticks to Windows, Charges Small Electronics | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

unconsumption:

The Window Socket is an idea so fabulously simple, it’s slightly amazing that we haven’t seen one before.

Designed by Kyuho Song & Boa Oh, the charger sticks to a window and draws solar power to an internal battery, which enables one to either plug small devices into the outlet right there and then, or save the stored power for use during nighttime hours.

Read more: Window Socket: Portable Solar-Powered Outlet Sticks to Windows, Charges Small Electronics | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building
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April Hale

Road Kill Jewlery 2005-2008

This body of work is based on the beauty that I see in the animals we accidentally and intentionally kill. The use of the actual animal in the work refers to both the previous existence of the material and the transformation the material has undergone in my hands (a metaphor for the transformation of the wild into a human-altered world). The animals I use are roadkill or have died due to some other human cause. No animals are ever killed for the purpose of inclusion in my work.

She intends for her pieces to be purchased and worn, but many potential buyers are too disgusted to even try them on. Although most people wear and eat animal products, few can stomach the idea of adorning themselves with intimate jewelry handmade from roadkill.

      
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unconsumption:


London-based designer Julia Lohmann thinks dried strips of seaweed could replace leather, paper and plastic to make everyday objects like these laser-cut kelp lampshade[s].
Lohmann used a laser cutting machine to create patterns in pieces of kelp before sewing them together, or stretched them into shape while wet to dry into new forms.

More at: Kelp lampshades by Julia Lohmann, including audio of an interview with Lohmann.

unconsumption:

London-based designer Julia Lohmann thinks dried strips of seaweed could replace leather, paper and plastic to make everyday objects like these laser-cut kelp lampshade[s].

Lohmann used a laser cutting machine to create patterns in pieces of kelp before sewing them together, or stretched them into shape while wet to dry into new forms.

More at: Kelp lampshades by Julia Lohmann, including audio of an interview with Lohmann.

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Christina Guitian is a Spanish artist working across illustration, sculpture and installation. 
Guitian’s solo exhibition Hinges presents an enigmatic tale of life and death.  Cristina’s striking hybrid compositions seem to both invite and defy decay through combining dismembered parts of discarded items including furniture, objects that belonged to the now deceased, broken taxidermy and other found objects, along with her own wood carvings.

Photography: Manuel Vázquez

Christina Guitian is a Spanish artist working across illustration, sculpture and installation. 

Guitian’s solo exhibition Hinges presents an enigmatic tale of life and death.  Cristina’s striking hybrid compositions seem to both invite and defy decay through combining dismembered parts of discarded items including furniture, objects that belonged to the now deceased, broken taxidermy and other found objects, along with her own wood carvings.

Photography: Manuel Vázquez

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Judith G. Klausner
Flora Dentata (Tooth & Nail)
dimensions6.5”×6.5”×6.5”materialsNail clippings, baby teethdate2009
Klausner is intrigued by the use of hair as an acceptable material in Victorian fancywork, and its ability to cause revulsion in contemporary audiences. Unlike most other body parts, its existence apart from its original source does not imply any harm to the person. The other materials that fit in this unusual category are baby teeth and nails. This floral arrangement is made from baby teeth and nail clippings (my own and those of family and friends who have donated them.) In addition to the examination of materials, this piece aims to explore gender roles and sexual repression both historical and contemporary.

Judith G. Klausner

Flora Dentata (Tooth & Nail)

dimensions6.5”×6.5”×6.5”materialsNail clippings, baby teethdate2009

Klausner is intrigued by the use of hair as an acceptable material in Victorian fancywork, and its ability to cause revulsion in contemporary audiences. Unlike most other body parts, its existence apart from its original source does not imply any harm to the person. The other materials that fit in this unusual category are baby teeth and nails. This floral arrangement is made from baby teeth and nail clippings (my own and those of family and friends who have donated them.) In addition to the examination of materials, this piece aims to explore gender roles and sexual repression both historical and contemporary.

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